What does Work in Progress mean?

Work in progress is a measure of the amount of work at a particular state of a workflow. What this means in practice is the amount of individual development tasks currently being undertaken by an individual or a count of how many widgets are at the same stage of a manufacturing process concurrently.

Why is it important and why shouldn’t it be ignored?

As it turns out, Work in Progress is a very important element in understanding the effectiveness of a team.  Experience shows that optimising the Work in Progress by determined an appropriate limit for each stage of a workflow can increase the rate at which work can flow through a workflow and therefore increase the effectiveness of a team. In effect, it encourages a team to focus on what is important at any given moment and reduces the impacts of context switching by limiting the amount of work being done at any point in time. Observing work in progress highlights blockers and bottlenecks clearly and obviously.

Given that this should seem like common sense to you it isn’t surprising that minimising work in progress features prominently in most “Agile” frameworks.

However, in practice common sense is not always applied.  In the wild you’ll often encounter teams that don’t manage their WIP limits. They will argue stubbornly that what you are suggesting, having the whole team focus of a small number of activities, is some sort of snake oil that will limit rather than improve the team. What you as an outsider will observe will include some or all of the following

  • Individuals seem busy but feel like they are never achieving anything. You will hear statements such as “I have not got any real work done today”. In fact they spend most of their time context switching.
  • Many pieces of work will be started but a lot less will be finished. There might be a sense that the team is on a death march and never gets to do the improvements that are desperately called for. Worst the team cost effectiveness may be in question.
  • Sometimes the result of a team rather than individuals dealing with too much work is a bottleneck later in the process. I often see this happens when there is an imbalance between development and testing. In order to eliminate the backlog of development work ready for testing stacking up, the work in progress limit for development should be reduced. In a multi skilled team this might free up enough people to clear the backlog quicker.

The first step towards minimising work in progress is to understand whether you have a problem. The simplest way to do this is to use a Kanban board and measure the number of items at a given status at any point in time.  It should be immediately apparent where the most work is occurring. It is then possible to set limits to ensure that the flow of work through the team’s process is maintained. Once you are comfortable with that a cumulative flow diagram provides a deeper view of the work flowing through a process over time. This might show for example that a Scrum team has too much work stacked up in “design” at the start of a sprint, and the same thing happens to work in “testing” at the end of the sprint. Using this insight, the team may self-organise themselves to limit these bottlenecks which results in a better flow overall.

Kanban CFD_1

That is the easy part. The hard part is getting the team to redistribute themselves to get the work flowing through and to avoid management types from thinking the key to optimising flow is by playing convoluted games of Resource Planning Tetris.

 

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