Last time I set the scene for a common scenario when using Web Apps hosted on Azure App Services. How do I connect to services hosted on a private network? This time I’ll walk through the first potential solution option.

Problem:

Code hosted in an App Service needs access to a web service endpoint hosted in an on premise private network. It must be possible for the on premise endpoint to identify traffic from your application hosted on App Services in Azure and only allow access to that traffic.

Solution Option – Site to Site VPN

Build a private network segment in Azure as an Azure VNET. Connect the App Service to the private Azure VNET using a Point to Site VPN. This acts as a private connection between your application hosted in the Azure multi tenanted App Service infrastructure, allowing it to access resources routable via the Azure VNET. Resources on the VNET are not able to access the Application. The on premise network is connected to the Azure VNET via a Site to Site VPN. This effectively extends the on premise network to the cloud allowing bi-directional communication between resources hosted on premise and those hosted in Azure via private network addressing.

Challenges

Network configuration is required within the on premise network to enable the VPN connection to function. This includes setup of either VPN software or an appliance and configuring network routing to ensure that traffic destine to Azure is routed through the VPN.

The network in Azure must be designed with the on premise network in mind. As a minimum, you need to understand the on premise network design enough to avoid address conflicts when creating the Azure VNET. More likely, any design principles in play on the on premise network are likely to extend to the cloud hosted network.

What this means in practice is that there needs to be collaboration and coordination between the people managing the on premise network and yourself. Depending on the situation this may not be desirable or even possible.

Context

The following diagram explains the configuration we are trying to achieve.

site2site(no ips)

The main components are:

Azure App Services: When setting up the point to site VPN you must define a network range. This is a range of addresses that Azure will select as the outbound IP addresses that the App Service hosted application presents into the Azure VNET. Whilst you might assume that this is the IP address of the server hosting your application it is not quite that straight forwards as Azure is working under the covers to make this all work. However, you can assume that traffic from your application will always originate from this range of addresses so if you make it sufficiently small it is suitable for whitelisting in firewalls, etc. without comprising security.

Azure VNET: Represents your virtual networking space in Azure. You define an address space in which all of your subnets and resources will live.

GatewaySubnet: This is created automatically when you create the VPN gateway in Azure. From experience, it is better to leave it alone. If you add a virtual machine or other networkable devices into this network, routing becomes more of a challenge. Consider this subnet to be the place where external traffic enters and leaves the Azure VNET. The gateway subnet exists inside your Azure VNET so its address range, must exist entirely within the Azure VNET address space.

Backend Subnet: This is an optional subnet. Its primary in this walkthrough is for testing. It is relatively simple to add a VM to the subnet so you can test whether traffic is propagating correctly. For instance, you can test that a Point to Site VPN is working if an App Service application can hit an endpoint exposed on the VM. Additionally, you can test that your Site to Site VPN is working if a VM on this subnet can connect to an endpoint on a machine on your on premise network via its private IP address. The subnet must have an address range within that of the Azure VNET and must not clash with any other subnet. In practice, this subnet can be the location for any Azure resource that needs to be network connected. For example, if you wanted to use Service Fabric, a VM Scale Set is required. That scale set could be connected to the backend subnet which means it is accessible to applications hosted as App Services. In this configuration, it has a two-way connection into the on premise network but a one-way connection from Azure App Service to resources on the backend subnet.

On Premise: This represents your internal network. For demonstration purposes, you should try to build something isolated from your primary Azure subscription. This builds confidence that you have everything configured correctly and you understand why things are working rather than it being a case of Azure “magic”. You could set this up in something completely different from Azure such as in Amazon Web Services and in a later post I’ll walk through how to do that. However, if you are using Azure ensure that your representation of your on premise network is isolated from the Azure resources you are testing. The IP address space of the on premise network and the Azure VNET must not overlap.

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