When starting out building websites with Azure, it is likely that you’ll start by deploying a Web App to Azure App Services. This is a great way to get you going but with all things as you invest more and more time and your solution grows up you might experience some growing pains.

All credit to Microsoft. You can build a sophisticated solution with Azure Web Apps and you can have it connect to an Azure SQL instance without really thinking about the underlying infrastructure. It just works.

The growing pains start when you want to connect this Web App to something else. Perhaps you need to connect to some other service hosted in Azure. Or perhaps you need to leverage a third-party system that does not allow connections over the Internet.

Some development focused organisation stumble here. They have chosen Azure for its PaaS capability so they don’t have to think about infrastructure. They can code, then click deploy in Visual Studio – job done. Unfortunately for them to break out of this closed world requires some different skills – some understanding of basic networking is required.

Getting through this journey is not hard but it requires breaking the problem down into more manageable pieces. Once these basics are understood they become a foundation for more sophisticated solutions. Over the next few posts I going to go through some of these foundation elements that allow you to break out of Web App running on Azure App Services (or any other type of App Service) first to leverage other resources running in your Azure subscription such as databases or web services running on VMs and then out into other services running in other infrastructure whether they be cloud hosted or on private infrastructure.

Over this series of posts I’ll be addressing the following scenario.

The code running in a Web App hosted on Azure App Services needs to call a Web Service endpoint hosted in a private network behind a firewall. The organisation says that they’ll only open the firewall to enable access to IP addresses that you own.

This discounts opening the firewall for the range of outbound IP address exposed by Azure App Services as there is no guarantee that you have exclusive use of them.

So the approach will be to build a network in Azure to which the Web App can connect. Then connect the Azure network to the private network by way of a private connection or by way of a connection over the Internet where traffic is routed through a network appliance whose outbound IP is one controlled by you.

 

 

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