When an organisation is moving from a top down process such as waterfall to an Agile methodology like Scrum, for the people involved it can feel like everything is coming off the rails. All the comfortable and reliable “process” is gone and now you really have to think. Change can be difficult and this type of change is no different.

When moving in this direction, a process or a framework is a safety net or a comfort blanket. If you are not careful people can miss the point of the Agile transformation and instead focus on the framework, methodology and tooling. Work management tools such as JIRA, which are a bit of a swiss army knife, can, if you are not careful, become another facet of the process safety net. Before long your work management tool is configured with so much “process” people have stopped thinking and any Agility that was blossoming in that organisation is slowly evaporating.

But let’s look at it from the other angle. Some small organisations have little to no process. From an outsider’s perspective, it looks like chaos but the reality is that these organisations have started from nothing and now have paying customers, so they must be doing something right.

These organisations might be looking to frameworks like Scrum to provide some stability and some predictability. They want to build on a successful foundation and grow without losing what made them special in the first place. So, you might look at implementing Scrum and related tooling simply to manage stories in a backlog. You might encourage using sprints to create a delivery cadence.

And then the backlash starts. In the same way waterfall practitioners think you are trying to take away their comfort blanket, so do the developers in the start-up that needs to mature. Whichever way you look at Scrum it has some rules. Okay, they may be called a framework but they are still rules. These rules drive home the point that to be stable and predictable you cannot have a free for all. The transforming organisation may start to realise that their current ways of working are not special and instead they need to conform with what the majority of the industry is doing.

In this situation, you must realise that processes or frameworks, even lightweight ones like Scrum, can be seen as a burden when transforming chaos into stability. While it might seem like common sense to you, the people undergoing the transformation may believe that agility is being lost, along with the innovation that got the organisation to that point in the first place.

 

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