Development teams often build up high levels of trust internally due to the nature of the constant collaboration between team members.  Whilst that internal trust increases and increases, it can cause a lack of trust of outsiders whether that be 3rd parties or even other internal teams. So, when there is a genuine case for reuse there is often a strong argument against it. A common one is that the high-quality standards of the team can only be assured if code is written in house.

And why not. Developers like writing code, therefore given the chance they will write “all the code”. But code has a cost in terms on maintaining a solution over time. And we will have to support the solution because software isn’t written once then forgotten about, it continuously evolves. And let’s not forget that writing scalable, reliable and adaptable distributed systems is hard.  Who really wants to be debugging a custom load balancing solution when your system is on its knees and customers are beating down your door. Why invest the next couple of months building yet another custom security solution when your competitors seem to be releasing new features every few weeks.

The IT industry is seeing trends that will hopefully consign that old insular mindset to the history books.

Cloud computing offers, amongst many other advantages, the opportunity of offloading complexity on to some other party. Why worry about heating and air conditioning in a custom data centre when all you really need to do is build a website? Economies of scale means that costs are substantially reduced but you need to remember that cloud offerings are built for the masses and if you don’t fit then you may not get the benefits you expected. Cloud solutions such as Azure and Amazon Web Services practically offer a menu of services that you pick based on your requirements for ease of use vs the flexibility and control that you need. At the extreme, serverless computing promises that you can deploy and run code in the cloud without ever worrying about how the underlying infrastructure will be scaled to meet demand.

There is a trend where many companies are reinventing themselves as tech companies – Netflix and Amazon are just a couple of examples of companies that in order to be disruptive in their particular marketplaces transformed themselves into technology companies. Over the last few years this has reached a tipping point and now many organisations are trying the same thing and expecting the same results. Whilst it is true that IT is fundamental to many business models and being technically savvy as an organisation has a key role to play it is unlikely that everyone needs to code their IT from the ground up.

By looking at the first movers in that space you see technologies being developed in house to solve a particular problem and then shared back to the community. Google created AngularJS and Facebook the Cassandra NoSQL database. Today anyone can pick up these projects for their own use and perhaps more importantly they can contribute to them allowing them to evolve independently.

So, my vision of a team that is successfully avoiding NIH Syndrome in 2017 is one that

  • Has a wide understanding of the technology landscape
  • Does not exhibit siloed thinking about technology stacks, particular products or architectures
  • Has the time and space to try new things
  • And is encourage to contribute back into the community that they take from.

Reusing open source software is not like picking apples from somebody else’s orchard. It is a two-way proposition. You use an open source project to enhance your own product – usually to save cost and time. Therefore, you should invest some of that time back even if it is to simply fix bugs or answer questions on Stack overflow. And here in lies the challenge. Many organisations do not yet see the value of reinvesting in the community that bootstrapped them to where they are today and are so single minded they cannot see beyond their own immediate business pressures to deliver more features. Whether this approach is sustainable – I’m not sure. But as more and more companies transform into technology companies the cream of the development world will come to expect certain values from their employers and as you know the cream rises to the top.

 

 

 

 

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